ICE: Arctic Post # 7

It’s what comes to mind when one thinks of the Arctic. But ice is not a simple subject; it forms in many ways and takes many forms, from delicate and beautiful to massive and frightening.

Chandelier ice

Chandelier ice, Burnside River

It can be a place to live, if you’re a polar bear.

Home

Hudson Bay

The poetry of ice and water can work its magic as you sit on the shore and contemplate the endless lonely reaches of the North.

Beaufort Sea at sunset

Beaufort Sea at sunset

Arctic rivers feature a type of ice that I have never seen in the south. Called “aufeis,” a German word meaning “ice on top,” it forms in winter when water rises from below and spreads on top of existing ice, creating a sort of layer cake that can be several metres high. During summer breakup, the layers have a haunting beauty.

Aufeis on Burnside River. Photo by Don Taves

Aufeis on Burnside River. Photo by Don Taves

Aufeis can be terrifying if you have to find a path through towering walls on a fast current that blocks retreat if you have picked the wrong channel.

Burnside River. Photo by Don Taves

Rafting the Splits on the Burnside River. Photo by Don Taves

Or it can just be a lot of fun.

Rafters at play while the guides try to find a thru-channel. Lagoon at mouth of Firth River.

Rafters at play while the guides try to find a thru-channel. Lagoon at mouth of Firth River.

 

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